magnum photos

Faces of Joy

Washington D.C., January 20th, 2009 Change has come: the street has a voice too!

Hussein Obama

President Obama's middle name is in honor of his grandfather, Hussein Onyango Obama. “Hussein” is a derivative of the Arabic name Hassan, meaning “to be good,” “Husayn” is the affectionate form.

Last Days of W

Alec Soth's images are paired with Bushisms, which refers to mispronunciations, unconventional words and phrasings by George W. Bush.

New Era

As thousands of people gather in Washington for Inauguration Day, Peter van Agtmael takes a reality check and shoots his way through the ecstatic crowds.

Obamania

On January 20th, 2009, masses of people gathered on the Mall in Washington D.C. to witness the inauguration of President Obama.

Access to Life: Vietnam

The percentage of Vietnam’s population infected with HIV is still low, at less than 1 percent. Most Vietnamese living with HIV became infected through contaminated needles while injecting drugs, and within this group, the rate of infection is radically higher. Because heroin and other drugs are cheap and casual use is common, HIV infection through drug use affects a larger part of the population in Vietnam than in many other countries.

Access to Life: Swaziland

Swaziland has the highest rate of HIV infection in the world, with more than one quarter of its population infected. Some 130,000 children have been orphaned or made vulnerable by the death of one or both of their parents. With so many infected, AIDS is impacting every aspect of life in Swaziland.

Access to Life: South Africa

With more than 5.5 million people living with HIV, South Africa remains the country with the highest number of infected people in the world. As in much of Sub-Saharan Africa, the face of AIDS is more and more a female one, and in some areas of South Africa, women are three times as likely to be infected as men.

Access to Life: Rwanda

Despite its troubled recent history, Rwanda’s rapid effort to combat AIDS has made free lifelong treatment available to 44,000 people—up from 4,000 people who had started treatment just five years ago. Rwanda stands out as one of the success stories in Africa, and is a model for how health care can reach all communities. Yet AIDS remains a serious health problem in a country rebuilding from war and genocide.
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